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Author: Subject: Shelby Aero EV Article
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[*] posted on 1-26-09 at 11:37 PM   «:|:»  Link to post Reply With Quote
Shelby Aero EV Article




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By Chuck Squatriglia January 23, 2009 | 5:38:55 PM (WIRED)

The guys at Shelby SuperCars, having taken down the mighty Bugatti Veyron to claim the title of fastest car on the planet, are challenging Tesla Motors for electro-supremacy with an EV it promises will put down 1,000 horsepower. The boutique automaker caught our attention when it first mentioned the Ultimate Aero EV last summer, and now it's come through with some specs. They're pretty outlandish — zero to 60 in 2.5 seconds? 10-minute recharge time? — but we'll suspend our skepticism long enough to clear some space in the Autopia Fantasy Garage. Shelby says the Ultimate Aero EV will showcase the company's "All-Electric Scalable Powertrain," which it says can be tailored to suit a wide variety of vehicles, from compact city cars to heavy-duty trucks and even military vehicles. Yeah, yeah. What about the Aero? For the uninitiated, Shelby SuperCars builds insanely overpowered and absurdly fast cars. The fossil-fuel–burning 2009 Ultimate Aero produces 1,287 horsepower and is said to be capable of 270 mph. That oughta be enough to retain the "world's fastest car" title Shelby took from Bugatti back in 2007 when an Aero hit 256.18 mph. As for the car's electric twin sister, Shelby says it'll feature twin liquid-cooled motors that together produce 1,000 horsepower and 800 pound-feet of torque. The Tesla — which, it should be said, favors agility over brawn, having been born of Lotus DNA — puts out 248 horsepower and 276 pound-feet. The twin-motor approach isn't unusual: Fisker Automotive is using it in the Karma plug-in sedan it showed off at the Detroit auto show. That power will flow through a three-speed automatic transmission that's electronically controlled to shift gears in less than a quarter of a second. Shelby says the Ultimate Aero EV will do zero to 60 in 2.5 seconds and top out at 208 mph. The battery — presumably lithium-ion, but Shelby doesn't say — will be good for 150 to 200 miles on a single charge. That seems reasonable, given that Tesla claims 224 for the Roadster. But Shelby's claim that its "Charge on the Run" on-board charging system recharges the battery in 10 minutes (at 220 volts) leaves us dubious. Shelby says the super EV will roll out of the factory by the end of this year. We're skeptical, because if there's anything Tesla has shown us, it's bringing a high-performance electric sports car to market on time and on budget is really freakin' tough. Still, Shelby says it'll have a running pre-production model by the end of the second quarter — and promises to bring it to "one of America's super-speedways to prove its claims" in front of journalists. We've already e-mailed Shelby for an invitation.






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[*] posted on 1-26-09 at 11:53 PM   «:|:»  Link to post Reply With Quote


TITS!!! I would also like to see how they plan on being able to recharge this thing in 10 minutes. They would have needed to figure out some trick that has eluded almost every tech company on the planet. They expect to be able to charge this thing up in 10 minutes or less and it takes my iPhone a couple hours to fully recharge... connect those dots.

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[*] posted on 1-27-09 at 12:54 AM   «:|:»  Link to post Reply With Quote


I really like electric cars, but I think I like hybrids more. The Fisker Karma seems to be about the best all around compromise in a vehicle.

I think I like the idea of being able to put gas engine and electric power to the wheels together for a shit load of power with low fuel consumption.

As far as being able to do hyper fast battery recharges, its almost impossible. The obstacles are many, but if nothing else, the battery would overheat and most likely catch fire. Thermal runaway is almost impossible to overcome. Putting that much energy into something in that short a period of time will create so much heat...


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[*] posted on 1-27-09 at 01:34 PM   «:|:»  Link to post Reply With Quote


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Originally posted by Aero
As far as being able to do hyper fast battery recharges, its almost impossible. The obstacles are many, but if nothing else, the battery would overheat and most likely catch fire. Thermal runaway is almost impossible to overcome. Putting that much energy into something in that short a period of time will create so much heat...

Not only that, but you have to think, where can you get that much power? To charge that fast means mega amps, more amps than I imagine most houses could provide without overloading something (ie the wiring!).

But in theory if you can get the power, control the heat, and have enough surface area contact to your storage cells, I don't see any reason it is not _possible_ in theory....but the real question is....do we really need that?

That aside, that car is fucking hot...would love to see that thing IRL.


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[*] posted on 3-11-09 at 01:47 PM   «:|:»  Link to post Reply With Quote


Well shelby might have gotten his hands on some custom batter packs too:


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MIT's revamped Li-ion batteries fully recharge in seconds, not hours
General Sciences
By Rick C. Hodgin
Wednesday, March 11, 2009 13:01
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Cambridge (MA) - MIT engineers have developed a type of high-speed tunnel for transporting electrical energy through lithium iron phosphate, a well-known battery material. The discovery may yield lithium ion batteries that fully discharge and recharge in seconds, rather than hours, making batteries lighter, more powerful, and finally suitable for the all-electric vehicle that can be recharged in the same amount of time it takes to refuel the tank today.


The high-speed recharge/discharge battery technology is of particular interest to the automotive industry because, as it takes a few minutes to refuel an automobile today, future electric "gas stations" could allow all-electric vehicles to pull in and fully recharge in about the same amount of time, giving electric vehicles a much easier consumer acceptance due to their much greater feasible range.

The work has been led by Gerbrand Ceder, professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and will be reported in the March 12 issue of Nature magazine.

The material is not new, however the MIT researchers have changed the way in which it is made. Marketable products are believed to be possible within two to three years, though they have already constructed a battery prototype in the lab which functions as expected. In addition, the discovery has already received commercial interest and is being licensed.

Lithium Ion batteries are great at storing large quantities of energy. However, they are slow to receive the charge, and relatively slow to give it back off. While this gives them their longevity, it is also a problem for adoption in a wide array of applications which need faster discharge and recharge times.

About five years ago, Ceder and his colleagues made an important, surprising discovery. It had long been thought that lithium ions, along with electrons, moved too slowly through the lithium iron phosphate. However, MIT engineers discovered, through computer calculations, that the material's lithium ions should be moving extremely quickly. The search was then on to figure out why they're not.

In the end, the scientists discovered that they could indeed move quickly, but only if high-speed lanes, or tunnels, existed in the material. According to MIT's press release:

"Further calculations showed that lithium ions can indeed move very quickly into the material but only through tunnels accessed from the surface. If a lithium ion at the surface is directly in front of a tunnel entrance, there's no problem: it proceeds efficiently into the tunnel. But if the ion isn’t directly in front, it is prevented from reaching the tunnel entrance because it cannot move to access that entrance."


The team then began to create a new surface structure, one which allowed the lithium ions to move quickly around the outside of the material. The new technique was then applied to a real battery which demonstrated it could be fully charged or discharged in 10 to 20 seconds.

As an additional bonus, because of the revamped surface structure of the new material, it did not degrade as much over repeated discharge and recharge cycles, making the batteries last longer.

The end result is the possibility of creating smaller, lighter batteries (because less material is used to generate the same amount of electricity). And by being able to recharge them in seconds, a quick trip to a local communal "power station" will provide a full-up recharge in the same amount of time it takes to get a cup of coffee.

MIT's work was funded by the National Science Foundation via the Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers program and the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The technology has also already been licensed by two currently undisclosed companies.


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